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ACBS World Conference 14

There’s no denying that compassion is a growing area of interest within the contextual behavioral science community. This year’s 14th annual World Conference guide was crammed with workshops, panel discussions, symposiums and even an afternoon plenary by self-compassion pioneer and World Con first-timer Kristin Neff.

ACBS World Conference 14

ACBS Highlights with President-Elect D.J. Moran

Daniel “D.J.” Moran, PhD, is a psychologist, international consultant, and the president-elect of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Sciences. On the Monday after the 14th annual ACBS World Convention, held in Seattle, WA, we caught up with him to get his take on the week’s events.

Praxis: What were you most looking forward to seeing this year at the conference?

Fresh Ideas

When we feel stuck in our work, all too often we allow fears about appearing inadequate or incompetent to keep us from seeking help. However, just as our guidance can help our clients to move forward, as clinicians, asking for help when we’re stuck in our work, or when we are unsure about which way to go, can be an important part of moving toward what matters.

When Should you Hire a Consultant?

Timothy Gordon, MSW

Tim Gordon, MSW, RSW, is a clinical social worker and the developer of Mindful Yoga-Based ACT (MYACT), an approach to group psychotherapy that combines the benefits of yoga and cognitive-behavioral group therapy. His research and academic writing has focused on using yoga and contemplative practices as a mental health intervention. 

Praxis: Talk to us a bit about how you’re incorporating yoga into your acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) work.

It’s not exactly news that mindfulness-based therapies are effective. A recent meta-analysis comprising 209 empirical outcome studies indicated that mindfulness-based treatments were effective in treating a variety of psychological disorders. They were as effective as cognitive behavior therapy and pharmacological treatments in the nine studies in which they were compared (Khoury et al., 2013).

image of the lotus flower

If you have used defusion in your therapy sessions, or any other technique aimed at helping clients create distance between themselves and the stories they tell themselves, you may recognize this common pitfall: If our thoughts are not absolute truths, then it may seem that there is no absolute meaning, no right or wrong, or no absolute point of reference.

Mind Universe illustration

When using any technique that involves helping clients to untangle themselves from the stories they tell about their lives and their struggles, and to realize that their thoughts are not absolute truths, you run the risk of invalidating their subjective experience.

image - woman with therapist

When using any technique that involves helping clients to untangle themselves from the stories they tell about their lives and their struggles, and to realize that their thoughts are not absolute truths, you run the risk of invalidating their subjective experience.

What is “defusion”? And why is it so important?

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