ACT BootCamp® for Behavior Analysts – Ft. Lauderdale

Up to 32
CE Hours available ( How do I get my CE? )
Steven C. Hayes, PhD Cofounder of ACT, leader of contextual behavioral science, and renowned author
Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, PhD, BCBA-D Behavior analyst, professor, and author
Thomas Szabo, PhD, BCBA-D Behavior analyst, trainer, and author
Jonathan Tarbox, PhD, BCBA-D Behavior analyst, program director of the behavior analysis Masters program at the University of Southern California, trainer, and author
Kristen Lancaster, MS, BCBA Professor and senior BCBA at Positive Behavior Support

About This Workshop

Join us for this 4-day ACT BootCamp® for Behavior Analysts workshop in sunny Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, with Steven C. Hayes, Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Tom Szabo and Jonathan Tarbox.

This workshop is designed to provide behavior analysts a foundational understanding of acceptance and commitment training (ACT). ACT began over three decades ago as a behavior analytic approach to intervention in verbally-able populations who might need excessive rule-governed behavior to be diminished in order to better contact and be regulated by direct contingencies. Its conceptual and empirical basis has strengthened considerably since 1982, and it is now fully entering into the armamentarium of BCBAs in areas such as the following:
  • Parent training
  • Staff management and development
  • Organizational work
  • Work with developmentally delayed populations and the chronically mentally ill
  • Educational settings with special needs students
ACT is a method for changing behavior by increasing psychological flexibility, meaning larger patterns of values-based behavior that fit the current context and are resistant to needless disruption by private events. Increasing research (including research published in behavior analytic journals) has shown that psychological flexibility is a key component in altering behavior across a wide variety of populations.

This workshop will give the behavior analyst a deeper understanding of the roots of ACT—including how verbal behavior as extended by relational frame theory (RFT) and radical behaviorism as extended into functional contextualism provides a solid foundation conceptually and philosophically. Behavior analysts will also learn skills and techniques they can use to increase psychological flexibility with their clients while still staying within their scope of practice. Experiential exercises provide attendees a hands-on way of understanding how ACT techniques influence psychological flexibility and overt behavior. Didactic presentations will range from a basic understanding of RFT, ACT, and functional contextualism to how BAs can apply these skills with specific populations.

Evening breakout sessions will cover topics such as scope of practice, ethics, and supervision. This workshop includes 4 hours of ethics and 3 hours of supervision CE credits.

Prior to registering, please review speaker-planner conflict of interest disclosures and complete CE information.

A discounted hotel room block is available at a cost of $159/night. Parking at the hotel is an additional $15/day for all attendees.

Program

7 November | Day 1, Thursday 

Steven C. Hayes | Intro. to ACT and the Psychological Flexibility Model | 6.5 CE Hours:

The first day of ACT BootCamp is designed to help attendees fit ACT and RFT into the development of behavior analysis and to gain a basic understanding of the psychological flexibility model in behavior analytic terms, as augmented by evolutionary principles and relational operants. The day will be largely conceptual and empirical, but not exclusively since examples given will consist ofACT methods, as applied to one’s self, team, and clients.

7:00 am – 8:00 am: Check-in*

8:00 am – 8:45 am: Orientation: Why ACT and RFT Matters for Behavior Analysts (2 Ethics CE hours)

8:45 am – 9:45 am: A Brief Behavioral History of ACT / RFT

9:45 am – 10:00 am: Morning Break*

10:00 am – 12:00 pm: The Psychological Flexibility Model: Defusion and Acceptance

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm: Lunch Break*

1:30 pm – 2:45 pm: The Psychological Flexibility Model—Self, Now, and Values

2:45 pm – 3:00 pm: Afternoon Break*

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm: The Psychological Flexibility Model—Values and Committed Action

4:30 pm – 4:45 pm: Afternoon Break (for those staying for Evening Workshop)*

Evening Workshop | 2 CE Hours:

4:45 pm – 6:45 pm: Applying ACT/RFT in Your BCBA Practice | Tim Weil

8 November | Day 2, Friday 

Ruth Anne Rehfeldt | 6.5 CE Hours:

7:30 am – 8:00 am: Check-in*

8:00 am – 9:45 am: Why ACT for Behavior Analysts?

9:45 am – 10:00 am: Morning Break*

10:00 am – 12:00 pm: ACT for Adolescents and Adults with Developmental Disorders and their Staff or Caregivers

12:00 pm – 1:30 am: Lunch Break*

1:30 am – 2:45 pm: ACT for Adolescents and Adults with Developmental Disorders and their Staff or Caregivers Continued

2:45 pm – 3:00 pm: Afternoon Break*

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm: Applications of ACT to the Community: Creating a Culture that Cares

4:30 pm – 4:45 pm: Afternoon Break (for those staying for the Evening Workshop)*

Evening Workshop | 2 Ethics CE hours:

4:45 pm – 6:45 pm: ACT and Scope of Practice | Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Tom Szabo, and Jonathan Tarbox

9 November | Day 3, Saturday  

Tom Szabo & Jonathan Tarbox | 6.5 CE Hours:

7:30 am – 8:00 am: Check-in*

8:00 am – 9:45 am: A Behavioral Conceptual Functional Analysis of the Hexaflex

9:45 am – 10:00 am: Morning Break*

10:00 am – 12:00 pm: ACT Functional Analysis Practice

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm: Lunch Break*

1:30 pm – 2:45 pm: The ACT Matrix and Catching Metaphors in Flight

2:45 pm – 3:00 pm: Afternoon Break*

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm: Physicalizing Metaphors with Parents and Kids with IDD

4:30 pm – 4:45 pm: Afternoon Break (for those staying for optional Evening Workshop)*

Evening Workshop | 2 CE Hours:

4:45 pm – 6:45 pm: Applying ACT in Chronic Adult Populations | Patty Bach

10 November| Day 4, Sunday 

Tom Szabo, Jonathan Tarbox & Kristen Lancaster | 6.5 CE Hours:

7:30 am – 8:00 am: Check-in*

8:00 am – 9:45 am: ACT and Organization Culture (2 Supervision CE hours)

9:45 am – 10:00 am: Morning Break*

10:00 am – 12:00 pm: ACT Approaches to Behavioral Coaching (Eating and Fitness)

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm: Lunch Break*

1:30 pm – 2:45 pm: ACT and School Culture and Violence

2:45 pm – 3:00 pm: Afternoon Break*

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm: Prosocial (1 Supervision CE hours)

No evening session on last night.

*Not available for CE

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:
  1. Explain the rationale for adopting psychological flexibility as a primary treatment outcome.
  2. Demonstrate how to use ACT procedures to help people spend less time struggling with private events and more time engaging in behavior that accomplishes important outcomes.
  3. Explain the difference between the focuses of ACT appropriate for behavior analysts versus those that are better left to those in psychotherapy and counseling fields.
  4. Describe the major lines of basic human operant research that led to the development of relational frame theory and ACT.
  5. Describe the historical trace from the early writings of Skinner, through the rule-governed behavior research and conceptualizations of language, to the contemporary account of relational frame theory as an explanation for human language and cognition.
  6. Describe the shortcomings of earlier theories of verbal behavior and language, the empirical limitations observed, and direct comparisons of these issues to the findings from relational frame research.
  7. Explain the limited role of the listener, and its critical importance to speak with meaning and listen with understanding.
  8. Describe the complex nature of human language from an RFT perspective.
  9. Explain the evidence basis for these technologies based on investigations into using them to treat child and adult behavioral rigidity.
  10. Describe the existing limitations in RFT research on language development, and what the future studies and research questions that remain unanswered.
  11. Demonstrate experiential exercises designed to promote flexibility in clients.
  12. Explain experiential exercises in terms of basic behavioral principles.
  13. Explain how ACT can be used for young adult and adult populations of persons with a wide range of disabilities.
  14. Describe prior work in the area of social development for this population using perspective taking, self-rule generation, goal-setting, social skills instruction and self-management.
  15. Describe how the seemingly complex concepts of ACT and the foundational RFT mechanisms can be tailored to persons with compromised verbal abilities and cognitive delays.
  16. Explain how to collect data on direct behavioral outcomes, indirect self-reports, and social validity for ACT interventions.
  17. Explain how the use of ACT with direct care staff and other caregivers may benefit their work with clients with severe developmental disorders.
  18. Explain how to describe teaching programs based on relational frame theory to children with and without disabilities.
  19. Describe and implement the various means of assessing relational skills in children.
  20. Describe and implement interventions to improve relational abilities in children.
  21. Demonstrate basic skills on the scope and depth to implementing the PEAK curriculum.
  22. Describe how various research studies were arranged to achieve improvements in intelligence, problem behavior reductions, and new skill acquisitions.
  23. Describe and implement individual and group based interventions to improve psychological flexibility in children.
  24. Explain how to practice the implementation of ACT within the scope of a behavior analyst, understand the boundaries of competency, and working collaboratively with other clinical professionals.
  25. Explain what subsequent research and clinical studies need to be conducted to further the empirical basis of applications of ACT for children.
  26. Explain what subsequent research and clinical studies need to be conducted to further the empirical basis of applications of RFT in children.
  27. Explain and give examples of the 6 ACT processes.
  28. Describe how to use ACT in behavioral coaching for health and fitness.
  29. Identify ACT processes in brief verbal snippets.
  30. Identify ACT processes in extended vocal exchanges between BCBA and client.
  31. Describe the 4 quadrants in the ACT Matrix.
  32. Use the ACT Matrix in role-plays.
  33. During role-plays using the ACT Matrix, re-state metaphors and construct physical exercises to illustrate ACT repertoires.
  34. Demonstrate how to role-play “acceptance” training practices and emphasize specific, measurable behaviors that are socially important.
  35. Demonstrate how to role-play “defusion” training practices and emphasize specific, measurable behaviors that are socially important.
  36. Demonstrate how to role-play “valuing” training practices and emphasize specific, measurable behaviors that are socially important.
  37. Explain experiential exercises in terms of basic behavioral principles.
  38. Explain and identify basic relational frames.
  39. Explain the rationale for adopting psychological flexibility as a primary treatment outcome.
  40. Demonstrate how to use ACT procedures to help people spend less time struggling with private events and more time engaging in behavior that accomplishes important outcomes.
  41. Implement ACT games suitable for use with children in school settings.
  42. Discuss Ostrom’s 8 design principles as a blueprint for implementing OBM 2.0 strategies.

Prerequisites

A background in behavior analysis is strongly recommended.

Audience

For behavior analyst professionals and students, beginner to advanced.

Recommended Reading

Dixon, M. R., & Paliliunas, D. (2018). AIM: A Behavior Analytic Curriculum for Social-Emotional Development in Children. Carbondale, IL: Shawnee Scientific Press.

Hayes, S. C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Roche, B. (2001). Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition. New York: Plenum Press.

Hayes, S. C. & Brownstein, A. J. (1986). Mentalism, behavior‑behavior relations and a behavior analytic view of the purposes of science. The Behavior Analyst, 9, 175‑190.

Hayes, S. C., Strosahl, K., & Wilson, K. G. (2012). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: The process and practice of mindful change (2nd edition). New York: Guilford Press.

Friman, P. C., Hayes, S. C., & Wilson, K. G. (1998). Why behavior analysts should study emotion: The example of anxiety. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 31, 137-156. doi: 10.1901/jaba.1998.31-137  Rehfeldt, R. A., & Barnes-Holmes, Y. (2009).  Derived relational responding: Applications for learners with autism and other developmental disabilities: A progressive guide to change. Oakland: New Harbinger Publications.

References

Dixon, M. R., & Paliliunas, D. (2018). AIM: A Behavior Analytic Curriculum for Social-Emotional Development in Children. Carbondale, IL: Shawnee Scientific Press.

Castro, M., Rehfeldt, R. A., & Root, W. B. (2016). On the role of values clarification and committed actions in enhancing the engagement of direct care workers with clients with severe developmental disorders. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 5 (4), 201-207.

Szabo, T. G. (in press). Acceptance and commitment training for reducing inflexible behaviors in children with autism. Journal of Contextual Behavior Science.

Tarbox, J., Dixon, D., Sturmey, P., & Matson, J (2014). Handbook of early intervention for autism spectrum disorders. New York: Springer.Wilson, D. S. & Hayes, S. C. (Eds.). (2018). Evolution and contextual behavioral science: An integrated framework for understanding, predicting, and influencing human behavior. Oakland, CA: Context Press / New Harbinger Publications.

Refund and Cancellation Policy

We understand, sometimes things come up!

Praxis will offer a full refund to registrants of both live and live-online trainings who cancel their registration up to 14 days before the course or workshop start date, minus an administrative processing fee of $30 for a 2-day workshop or online course, and a $50 fee for a 4-day workshop. If cancelled within 14 days, no refund will be issued, however, a credit for the same amount will be applied toward another learning product, which expires within 1 year. Please email us at events@praxiscet.zendesk.com to cancel a registration.

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November 7–10, 2019
8:00am–4:30pm
Gallery One Fort Lauderdale
2670 E Sunrise Blvd
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33304
Reserve your room!

Available Discounts

  • Register 3 or more people at once for a 20% discount.
  • Register before September 26 for a $50 discount.
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