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psychology blog continuing education acceptance commitment therapy training courses online

Many evidence-based therapies focus on teaching clients to use coping skills that will help them in moments of emotional distress. In spite of the large number of people who struggle with emotion-regulation issues, most therapies tend not to focus on the component of treatment that teaches clients to respond to emotional challenges while in a triggered state.

By David D. Burns, MD

There have been many exciting developments in psychotherapy in the last several years. Many of them have evolved as a result of my free weekly psychotherapy training groups at Stanford for students, faculty, and community mental health professionals.

Authors: Jonathan W. Kanter, PhD Ajeng Puspitassari, MA Maria Santos, MA Gabriela Nagy, BA  

Social work is grounded in the values of service, social justice, integrity, and competence, and is committed to promoting the dignity and worth of individuals and human relationships (National Association of Social Workers, 1999; Reamer, 2006). 

Steven C. Hayes, cofounder of ACT

A Handy Guide to Our ACT Training Series

You’re a mental health professional who has had some interaction with acceptance and commitment therapy, whether you’re an experienced ACT practitioner or you’ve only just heard of ACT, and you want to learn how to get started. Maybe you’ve read ACT books and are craving hands-on training. So, how do you know which ACT training is right for you?

By Benjamin Schoendorff, MA, MSc

Imagine you could work less while helping your clients more. In addition to your clinical effectiveness increasing, you’d have more energy to engage in what’s important to you beyond work.

Therapists find that the most useful workshops focus either on building clinical skills or honing our self-care skills. Participants of my workshops consistently report it combines both dimensions.

​As a clinician, how do you go from feeling connected and moved by ACT, to fluidly implementing functional analysis and the six core processes into your sessions?

In Advanced Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: The Experienced Practitioner’s Guide to Optimizing Delivery, Darrah Westrup, PhD, describes three steps in the ACT learning curve.

By Tiffany Brown, Praxis Blog Editor

​As a clinician, how do you go from feeling connected and moved by ACT, to fluidly implementing functional analysis and the six core processes into your sessions?

In Advanced Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: The Experienced Practitioner’s Guide to Optimizing Delivery, Darrah Westrup, PhD, describes three steps in the ACT learning curve.

Sketch demonstrating the ACT Matrix
The key to psychological flexibility and valued living is noticing the difference between five senses and mental experience and noticing the difference between moving toward who or what is important versus moving away from unwanted inner experience.

The matrix is a diagram about noticing—a diagram that can, as it turns out, cue psychological flexibility. It’s composed simply of two bisecting lines: the vertical line representing experience and the horizontal line representing behavior.

When acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is introduced to clinicians, it may come off as a set of sequential steps to be applied in session. 

ACT’s core processes—acceptance, defusion, self as context, committed action, values, and contact with the present moment—may seem to stand alone. However, in practice the processes are not so neatly distinguished. 

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