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Book Covers: The ACT Matrix and the Essential Guide to the ACT Matrix

Editor’s Note: This is the second half of a two-part Q&A with the editors of The ACT Matrix: A new Approach to Building Psychological Flexibility Across Settings and Populations

Helping clients and trainees to adopt a functional contextual viewpoint is an important goal of ACT. Can you briefly explain what that means and why it’s so important?

Book Covers: The ACT Matrix and the Essential Guide to the ACT Matrix

Editor’s Note: This is part one of a two-part Q&A with the editors of The ACT Matrix: A new Approach to Building Psychological Flexibility Across Settings and Populations.

Briefly summarize the ACT matrix—it’s purpose and function.

When people enter therapy, they’re stuck, which is another way of saying inflexible. People can get stuck in all sorts of ways. They get stuck because they can’t imagine other options than moving away from unwanted inner stuff. They get stuck because what’s important to them is obscured by their struggle against unwanted inner stuff. They get stuck because they focus exclusively on unwanted inner stuff. They get stuck because they have trouble contacting their five-senses experience and can’t notice how their actions affect other people and their own life.

Editor's Note: This is the second part of a two-part Q&A with one of the authors of ACT and RFT in Relationships, JoAnne Dahl, PhD. If you missed part one, catch up here.

In the book, you talk about self-as-content being a particularly hazardous perspective for people in romantic relationships. Can you elaborate on that?

As we’ve discussed in earlier posts this month, college counseling centers (CCCs) have unique needs which influence what kinds of groups are offered and how groups are run. With limited resources and the need for a time-limited treatment model, coupled with increasingly severe and complex problems among the student population, effective short-term interventions are necessary. Because of the variety of presenting problems for which students seek help, it can be difficult to compose a group with members who share a common diagnosis.

Over the past several weeks we’ve reviewed both the alarming rates of mental health issues among college students and presented some of the ways researchers are currently testing to apply mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions in college counseling centers.

In Mindfulness and Acceptance for Counseling College Students: Theory and Practical Applications for Intervention, Prevention and Outreach, clinical researcher Jacqueline Pistorello, PhD, explores how mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), a

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